Movies and Art #15

The Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson 2014) and Grand Hotel Semiramis (Joseph Cornell)

No art and movie list would be complete in my opinion without the inclusion of at least one Wes Anderson movie. His particular style with pastel colors and the feel of a picture postcard is so akin to the assemblages of Joseph Cornell I am left to wonder if Wes Anderson was influenced by his work. There is even the feeling of containment in his movies, the story centering around a physical place such as an island, school or hotel.

References:

IMDB

Ibiblio

Movies and Art #14

Life of Pi (Ang Lee 2012) and Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee around a Pomegranate a Second before Awakening (Salvador Dali)

There are many pictorial connections between these two works: A tiger bounds forth from the sea toward a solitary figure on an island. Beyond the objects found in both there is a question posed about what is real and what is imagined.

References:

IMDB

Wikiart

Movies and Art #13

Temple Grandin (Mick Jackson 2010) and Composition VIII (Wassily Kandinsky)

In the film, Temple sees solutions which are illustrated as geometric overlays in motion. In a similar fashion we see Kandinsky describing motion and energy though geometric shapes and a restless composition.

References:

IMDB

Ibiblio

Movies and Art #11

Mary and Max (Adam Elliot 2009) and Two Figures (Barbara Hepworth)

Mary and Max depicts the human connection between two unlikely and differing characters. The work, Two figures by Barbara Hepworth reminds me of those characters in how they stand side by side, staring, perhaps sharing a vision without actually touching. So similar, yet unique.

References:

IMDB

Artchive

Movies and Art #10

The Counterfeiters (Stefan Ruzowitzky 2007) and Nudes in a Meadow (Ernst Ludwig Kirchner)

The Counterfeiters is one of my favorite movies and as much of it occurs in a Nazi concentration camp there is quite a bit of darkness to go around both emotionally and cinematically. Similarly, in the Nudes in a Meadow painting we see a stark contrast made beween the figures and the background. In both works there is a focus on humans contrasting with thier surroundings.

The film is a true story and the story of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner is directly related. He was a German painter, printmaker, and one of the founders of Expressionism. In 1933 he was branded “degenerate” as part of the Nazi purge of modern art that did not exhalt “blood and soil”. Hundreds of his works were destroyed shortly after his fleeing to Switzerland.

References:

IMDB

Wikiart

Wikipedia

Movies and Art #9

Thank You for Smoking (Jason Reitman 2005) and Football Player (J.C. Leyendecker)

Illustration is is strongest when there is a depiction of story. In the work of J.C. Leyendecker there are strong characters depicted in their prime moments whether it is a military homecoming or a football hero resting on the sidelines. These illustrations were essential to heyday of Madison Avenue. In Thank You for Smoking we see these advertising icons in a different light.

IMDB

Wikiart

Movies and Art #8

Big Fish (Tim Burton 2003) and Alice in Wonderland (Mary Blair)

Tim Burton and Mary Blair both worked extensively for Disney and their work could be dismissed as being too light to be considered more seriously. However in both cases we find some exploration into a darker world where the main character is exploring not only a new and strange world but one where they must confront themselves.

References:

IMDB

Wikiart

Movies and Art #7

Waiting for Godot (Michael Lindsay-Hogg 2001) and Morning Sun (Edward Hopper)

The depiction of non-action can be an interesting subject for art. What is not revealed makes the subject more powerful. Just as Godot never arrives to the lone tree in a barren landscape, we see in “Morning Sun” a woman also in a stark environment paused – perhaps in reflection.

References:

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Wikiart

Movies and Art #6

Billy Elliot (Stephen Daldry 2000) and Marcelle Lender Dancing in the Bolero in Chilperic (Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec)

Billy could not help himself, the boy had to move when he heard music. That same passion is conveyed in the depiction of Marcelle Lender dancing; her twisting figure swinging the fabric of her dress into a flower like shape.

References:
IMDB
Wikiart

Movies and Art #5

Run Lola Run (Tom Tykwer1998) and Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2) (Marcel Duchamp)

Motion is simply a change of position over time, film depicts this quite easily as it shows a sequence of moments in a series. Run Lola Run goes further to show a series of alternating paths with flash forward depictions to show the ripples of cause and effect. In Duchamp’s painting there is also a depiction of time as we see the figure repeatedly as if revealed by a strobe light. In both cases the creator has successfully integrated the element of time.

IMDB

Philadephia Museum of Art